This is a small selection of the items available to characters within the Wizarding World, but it includes all items that can be initially purchased during your 1st class year, as well as additional items that can be acquired during later years.

Items you currently have on your person (except your wand and clothing items) take up an inventory slot on your character. Characters usually only have 7 inventory slots, though some items unlock additional inventory slots (for a maximum of 9 inventory slots).
Some item names are followed by parentheses, listing the body slot the item occupies. You cannot have two items that both have the same Body Slot.

Items with a "-" availability are things you always (or almost always) have access to, even if you don't currently have one in your inventory.
Items with a Rare availability are only available for purchase with DM approval.


Consumable Items

Candies

There are many kinds of magical candies within the Wizarding World, and many have extremely useful effects. Eating a piece of candy (or feeding one to someone else) is a standard action.
Name
Description
ʛ Cost
Availability
Delightful Magical Candy!
Improves moods
4
Common
Fizzing Whizzbees
Increases speed
8
Common
Hiccough Sweet
Causes fit of hic-coughing
4
Common
Skiving Snackbox
Makes you look sick
4
Common
Spit Drops
Detects lies
8
Uncommon
  • Delightful Magical Candy!: The wizarding world is full of too many varieties of delightful candy to count, and many (lets not kid ourselves - most) enjoy them immensely. While many of these treats have no effects of notes beyond eliciting a momentary giggle, offering these treats to an interested party will give you a +1 alchemical bonus on persuasion checks against that creature for 1 minute.
  • Fizzing Whizzbees: These large sherbet balls cause you to float a tiny bit off the ground as long as you aren't otherwise moving - its almost impossible to balance in this way, but the candy does make you light on your feet, giving you a +5ft alchemical bonus to your speed for 1 hour.
  • Hiccough Sweet: These wicked confections induce a terrible fit of hiccoughing when eaten, causing a result identical to confusion for 1d4 rounds.
  • Skiving Snackbox: The many strange varieties of this particular candy cause the person eating them to appear terribly sick in one of a several ways, with just enough magic causing the effect that it passes most forms of casual scrutiny. Eating one of these will give you a +2 alchemical bonus on persuasion checks to convince creatures you are extremely ill (assuming they care).
  • Spit Drops: A candy made from the spit of a lying cat, sucking on it takes about 10 minutes and allows you to automatically know when the first lie is told in your presence during this time. The indication is an abrupt and brief sour flavor.

Pharmaceuticals

More expensive than candy, magical pharmaceuticals are available to provide safe, regulated benefits. Consuming (or otherwise utilizing) a pharmaceutical (on you or someone else) is a standard action.
Name
Description
ʛ Cost
Availability
Antidote Capsule
Removes poison
10
Unusual
Concentration Capsule
Improves Concentration
10
Unusual
Dentifricium Mouthwash; Bottle
Wakes you up
20
Uncommon
Replenishing Capsule
Restores magic focus
15
Unusual
  • Antidote Capsule: A pharmaceutical drug that immediately removes the poison from a character, but can only work once per hour.
  • Concentration Capsules: A pharmaceutical drug that enhances a character's concentration skills. If you take one of these capsules, you get a +2 alchemical bonus on concentration checks for 1 hour.
  • Dentifricium Mouthwash: This powerful african-red-pepper-based mouthwash is great for cleaning your teeth, but everyone knows a powerful swig will also wake someone up from even the most magical of slumbers. A swallow wakes a character up from unconsciousness and sleep (even magical sleep), and a bottle has 5 swallows.
  • Replenishing Capsule: A pharmaceutical drug that increases the magic focus you regain at the start of your next turn by +1.

Herbs and Potions

Herbs are cultivated by many members of the wizarding world, most often trained herbalists. Should you want to acquire their herbs, you can purchase them from shops or herbalists directly for the values listed on the Herbalism page. Consuming (or otherwise utilizing) an herb (on you or someone else) is a standard action.
Potions are far more delicate than most consumable items (indeed, converting a potion into something more stable like a candy or pharmaceutical is big business in the wizarding world!), and so are rarely sold in large quantities since they only last about a week once brewed. More often they are brewed when ordered, and most often people just brew their own! A potion is generally sold for 50% more than its raw ingredients cost, but thats only a baseline. The price of raw ingredients can be found on the Potions page.


Permanent Items

Many permanent magical items are part of Sets, which grant bonuses if enough pieces are worn together.

Accessories

A broad category of equipment, these items include things like books and jewelry - permanent items a character can carry around.
Name
Description
ʛ Cost
Availability
Broomstick
Allows for flying
30*
Common
Cauldron
Allows for making potions
15
Common
Divining Implement
Allows for divining
10
Common
Pouch
Carries non-potion consumables
20
Common
Potion Satchel
Carries quick-access potions
30
Uncommon
  • Broomstick: A useful and powerful magical device, a broomstick allows someone studying Flying to fly, though this one doesn't appear to do anything special beyond make the class abilities possible. You can't have a minor in Flying unless you have one of these. A broomstick is more difficult to acquire for non-pure-bloods. A broomstick purchased as part of starting equipment costs 40 galleons for a half-blood, and 50 galleons for a muggle-born.
  • Cauldron: A good cauldron is essential for anyone expecting to study Potions, though this one doesn't appear to do anything special beyond make the class abilities. You can't have a major or minor in Potions unless you have one of these.
  • Divining Implement: A good implement for focusing your mind and interpreting the universe's whispers is essential for anyone expecting to study Divinations, though this one doesn't appear to do anything special beyond make the class abilities possible. You can't have a minor in Divination unless you have one of these.
  • Pouch: Though a pouch only takes up 1 inventory slot, you can fill it with up to 5 non-Potion consumables (generally candy, pharmaceuticals, and herbs).
  • Potion Satchel: Though a potion satchel only takes up 1 inventory slot, you can fill it with up to 3 potions (including potion kits). Even better, you can rig one of those potions to be "quick access," able to be drunk as a bonus action instead of a standard action. Only 1 potion can be rigged in such a way at a time, though, and it takes several minutes to rig up a new one.

Clothing

All equipment that can be worn will be found here. Clothing equipment doesn't use up inventory slots.
Name
Description
ʛ Cost
Availability
Basic Clothes
Nondescript clothing
5*
-
Backpack
Adds an inventory space
30
Common
Dress Robes
Formal school attire
15*
Common
Unique Clothes
Unique clothing
10
Common
  • Basic Clothes (Outfit): Any outfit that confers no special bonus or has any special effect or meaning. You can have a basic outfit as part of your starting equipment for 0 galleons.
  • Backpack (Back): A common backpack, while easy to forget about, can be invaluable for fitting in an extra item over what your pockets alone could do. Wearing a backpack unlocks an inventory slot.
  • Dress Robes (Outfit): A special outfit for your wizarding school, required wear for all formal occasions. If you do not wear dress robes at a formal wizarding school occasion, it is an offense of varying severity based on the occasion in question and what you outfit you are wearing instead. All characters must purchase dress robes as part of their starting equipment, and muggle-born must pay an additional 5 galleons to acquire dress robes as part of starting equipment.
  • Unique Clothes (Outfit): Any outfit that confers some sort of non-magical special bonus or effect, or has a special meaning.

Weapons

Any equipment that can be used to harm others can be found here. Unless a weapon's description says otherwise, attacking with a weapon is a physical combat check made as a standard action, and damage dealt is reduced by physical durability.
If you are Skilled with a weapon, you add your Fitness modifier to the damage you deal with it. Some weapons have other effects based on whether you are Skilled or not.
Causing harm with weapons other than fists is a much more severe offense at wizarding schools than causing harm with spells.
Name
Description
ʛ Cost
Availability
Fists
Deals 1d2 damage
-
-
Club
Deals 1d4 damage
-
Common
Knife
Deals 1d4 damage
25
Common
Torch
Deals 1 damage
15
Common
Sword
Deals 2d4 damage
50
Unusual
Musket
Deals 2d6 damage
100
Rare
  • Fists: You can attack adjacent creatures with your fists, and are always considered to be wielding your fists as long as your hands are free and you are conscious.
  • Club: You can attack adjacent creatures with a club as long as you are wielding it. If you are not Skilled with a club, every time you deal damage with it there is a 30% chance it breaks and is useless.
  • Knife: You can attack adjacent creatures with a knife as long as you are wielding it. If you are Skilled with a knife and wielding one, but don't attack with it, you gain a +1 competence bonus on physical combat checks made with another weapon you are wielding.
  • Torch: You can attack adjacent creatures with a torch as long as you are wielding it. If you are Skilled with a torch, you can use your bonus action after dealing damage to an adjacent creature with to burn the creature for 1d2 rounds.
  • Sword: You can attack adjacent creatures with a sword as long as you are wielding it.
  • Musket: You can attack creatures within 40 feet with a rifle as long as you are wielding it. After you have attacked with a Musket, you must reload it as a standard action. If you are not Skilled with a musket, attacking with a musket is a full-round action, and you take a -1 penalty on physical combat checks with it. If you are Skilled with a musket, you can choose to take a -2 penalty on physical combat checks with it to attack a creature within 80 feet.